Knight of Flame coverScott Eder’s Knight of Flame is an exploration of the power of love, forgiveness and reason over hatred, guilt and selfishness, done with bold expertise and more than a dash of imagination. Eder’s story-craft is vibrant and original, a must read whether you are at the beach or on your lunch hour.

Synopsis:

Fire. The most chaotic of the primal elements. When wielded properly by the Knight of Flame, it burns like the sun. Otherwise, it slowly consumes the Knight, burning away his control, driving him towards dark deeds.

Stationed in Tampa, FL, Develor Quinteele, sixth Knight of Flame, waits impatiently for the predicted emergence of the last Gray Lord, his Order’s ancient enemy. Hampered by a centuries-old tragedy, Dev knows of only one way to control his elemental power—rage. It broils just below his surface, waiting for the slightest provocation to set it alight.

After a brutal attack by the Gray Lord’s minions for which Dev is blamed, he’s stripped of his freedom until he learns to control his violent impulses. With the help of his fellow Knights, can he balance his rage and unlock his true elemental potential to prevent Tampa’s devastation?

Review:

Knight of Flame is book one in the Knights Elementalis series and I can’t wait for book two. Eder has melded the chilvalric code of medieval knights with the more ancient metaphysical concept of four universal elements of creation: Earth, Air, Fire and Water. The first book focuses on the element of fire and through it, explores the need for self-control and the balancing power of love.

Though the two threads the form the premise for this book go back into antiquity, Eder  melds them together to form something new, fresh and provocative. The story is fast paced and tightly written with characters who, despite their fantastic powers, the reader can empathize with. Cassidy Sinclair, the female lead and a pure human, is particularly well-drawn, with strengths, frailties, and baggage that are common to the human condition without being cliché.  In fact, Eder draws his female characters with the same moral fortitude and strength as his male characters, a refreshing change from much of the most popular fantasy novels. Neither does he ignore the basic human needs of his characters, even the superhumans among them, both male and female.

In fact, the only character who is not fully articulated, and perhaps this is deliberate and will be remedied in later installments, is Stillman, the Knight’s leader, who at times seems a bit contradictory in his actions, often without a satisfying explanation. This small caveat in no way detracted from my enjoyment of the book, though. It was more of a “hmmm,” than a “what?!”

In the fantasy genre, it doesn’t get much better than the Knights Elementalis. Pick up a copy of Knight of Flame if you get a chance. You won’t be sorry.

Bio:

Since he was a kid, Scott wanted to be an author. Through the years, fantastic tales of nobility and strife, honor and chaos dominated his thoughts. After twenty years mired in the corporate machine, he broke free to bring those stories to life.

Scott lives with his wife and two children on the west coast of Florida.

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